Free Shipping on US Orders over $50

Pillsbury Mountain

Pillsbury Mountain

On a beautiful Sunday morning, Evan and I made our way to Speculator in search of another Adirondack fire tower to hike. After hearing many good things about Pillsbury Mountain and the amazing views from its fire tower, we were excited to make the 3.2 mile roundtrip trek. Pillsbury Mountain is one of the highest peaks in the Southwest Adirondacks weighing in at 3,597 feet, and being off the beaten path, it is fairly quiet.

To reach the trailhead, follow 6 miles of dirt roads through a logging area back to Sled Harbor, where you can either venture on (the roads are very rough, but manageable in dry weather) or park and hike in the last 1.2 miles. The trail to the summit climbs steadily, and sometimes steeply, until the final approach which is a nice forest walk filled with that true Adirondack scent – balsam. Also, keep an eye out for some neat mushrooms; they were all over the place along the trail! While there were not many views on the way up and the fire tower cabin is currently closed, the views from the stairs are still incredible. The fire tower offers wonderful vistas of the Siamese Ponds Wilderness to the east, the Cedar River Flow to the north, and Indian Lake and Snowy Mountain to the northeast.




Also in Perspectives

Sunrise from Phelps Mountain
Sunrise from Phelps Mountain

The forecast called for clear blue skies, so I thought it would be a great opportunity to catch a sunrise from the top of one of the Adirondack Peaks.

Read More

Backpacking Avalanche Pass to Lake Colden
Backpacking Avalanche Pass to Lake Colden

From Heart Lake, you’ll stroll through aromatic pine forests, travel past Marcy Dam, clamber over wooden planks along Avalanche Pass, stroll next to expansive Lake Colden, and eventually pitch a tent along the Opalescent Brook. Overall it’s a circa 12-14 mile round-trip out-and-back, with some different routes returning around Lake Colden.

Read More

XC-Skiing to Camp Santanoni
XC-Skiing to Camp Santanoni

For years Evan and I have been wanting to get back to the Great Camp Santanoni and we were finally able to make that happen!  Camp Santanoni, now a 32-acre National Historic Landmark, was established in the late 19th century by Robert C. and Anna Pruyn.  As an escape from life in Albany, Camp Santanoni was a place to entertain guests and explore the Adirondack Forest Preserve.

Read More