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Phelps Mountain

Phelps Mountain

A beautiful and accessible high peak, Phelps is a good family-friendly hike, not for the super little ones, but for any kids who can do a 9-mile round-trip. Given its accessibility and the regular use of its trails, Phelps is also a popular mountain to ski or snowshoe during the winter. Phelps is named for Old Man Phelps, the well-known guide who cut the first trail up Marcy and led many trips to its summit.
Street Mountain

Street Mountain

One of the most accessible “trail-less” peaks, Street is typically hiked in the same trip as Nye. While Street has a wooded summit, there is an opening with a decent view near the summit. Since both Street and Nye have poor views and unmaintained trails, they tend to be quieter options than many of the other hikes that begin at Adirondack Loj, and are a good bet if you’re looking to run into fewer people during the busy season.
Lower Wolfjaw Mountain

Lower Wolfjaw Mountain

The Wolfjaws are said to have received their name from the painter Alexander Wyant, who began summering in Keene in 1869 and from a vantage point on Noonmark Mountain he painted the mountains with this representation in mind. Lower Wolfjaw has a better view than Upper, and can be hiked solo or en route to Upper Wolfjaw, Armstrong, and Gothics.

Upper Wolfjaw Mountain

Upper Wolfjaw Mountain

Generally climbed alongside Lower Wolfjaw, Armstrong, and Gothics, Upper Wolfjaw is not the most remarkable of the four peaks. That said, it is often a good and quiet stopping point for lunch as it’s close to the middle mark if you’re climbing all four. While the summit is somewhat treed, there are a number of side trails leading to various lookouts near the top that provide good views of the neighboring peaks and great places to pause and eat your lunch.
Esther Mountain

Esther Mountain

Sometimes thought of as Whiteface’s little sister, Esther is often hiked in the same day as Whiteface and is named for Esther McComb, who in 1839 at only 15 tried to summit Whiteface, got lost, and ended up climbing this peak instead. With great views of its neighbor Whiteface as well as views of Lake Placid and the nearby lowlands, Esther is a perfect moderate-level hike.
Big Slide Mountain

Big Slide Mountain

Known (and named) for the rock slide on its south face, Big Slide is one of the less challenging high peaks and offers incredible views from the summit to boot. It can be hiked as an out and back or as a loop, hiking over two smaller peaks on one leg of the trip.

Allen Mountain

Allen Mountain

Allen Mountain is definitely one of the more remote Adirondack High Peaks, with a long hike in and an unmaintained trail (herd path) to the top. As a result, it’s not as popular as some of the more accessible peaks, although it does boast some beautiful views from its summit, something that many of the other unmaintained peaks cannot say.
Mount Marshall

Mount Marshall

Mount Marshall is named after Robert Marshall, who drafted up the original list of the 46 peaks with his brother George. He was also the first to summit all 46ers alongside Herb Clark.
Seward Mountain

Seward Mountain

Named after William Henry Seward, a New York Governor and Secretary of State in Lincoln’s cabinet, this mountain is often climbed in the same trip as Donaldson and Emmons, the three mountains together making up the Seward Range.

Hough Peak

Hough Peak

Named for one of the Adirondack’s early conservationists, Franklin Hough, this peak is usually hiked in conjunction with the Dix peaks and Macomb.
Armstrong Mountain

Armstrong Mountain

Named after Thomas Armstrong, a local lumberman in the 1800s, Armstrong isn’t one of the most popular peaks in the area and is often hiked in conjunction with the Wolfjaws and Gothics.
Macomb Mountain

Macomb Mountain

Macomb is one of the unmarked peaks in the Dix Wilderness, and while easy to hike by itself, it is often hiked in conjunction with the Dix peaks and Hough, particularly given that the trailhead is quite remote.


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