Pillsbury Mountain

Pillsbury Mountain | Pure Adirondacks

The Pillsbury Mountain Fire Tower has an interesting history – first made of wood in 1918, it was rebuilt out of steel not much later in 1924. Pillsbury may seem like it’s in the middle of nowhere after following long back roads to get there, but the reward will be peaceful trails, expansive views, and just the right amount of tranquility!

Trail Stats:

Distance 3.2 miles round-trip
Elevation 3,597 ft
Ascent 1,300 ft

 

Pillsbury Mountain is a fairly short trail, only 1.6 miles to the top, but is moderately steep, ascending 1,300 feet in that distance. The trail begins with a slight descent to a river crossing before the climb begins on the other side of the river. The trail then climbs steadily upwards, bringing you to a ridge where you will start to be able to see the view between the trees. As the ridge becomes less steep the trail widens at the opening where the fire tower stands. There are some views from the summit, but the best views are from the fire tower itself – while you may not be able to go into the viewing deck of the tower, the views from the stairs are worth taking them up as high as you can make it!

Also, be sure to visit our Adirondack Fire Towers page if you're looking for more details and a full list of the towers. There's also information about the Adirondack Fire Tower Challenge if you're looking for a new hiking challenge to take on. 

Trailhead:

Coming from the intersection of Route 28 and Route 30 in Indian Lake, you will take Route 30 southward toward Speculator. Follow 30/Jessup Rd until the intersection with Military Road – take a right on Military Road and then take a left at the Sled Harbor clearing and follow the road until the trailhead. If the road looks too muddy or difficult for your car, you can park at the clearing and walk a mile to the trailhead.

Have any photos you'd like to share from your own hike up Pillsbury? Email us to share!


Keep it PURE

Remember to Leave No Trace! Buy a physical map, read it, plan, and prepare. Think about the NYS Rangers and medical personnel that exhaust themselves for a rescue that could have been avoided. Pack out your trash. Use a bear canister when primitive camping and cook away from where you’re sleeping. Do the rock walk to help reduce the impact on fragile alpine vegetation. Camp at designated campsites and never camp on or near summits.

Trail Conditions

Know before you go
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